Theodore Sturgeon

Theodore Sturgeon
Theodore Sturgeon.jpg
BornEdward Hamilton Waldo
(1918-02-26)February 26, 1918
Staten Island, New York, U.S.
DiedMay 8, 1985(1985-05-08) (aged 67)
Eugene, Oregon, U.S.
Pen nameE. Waldo Hunter
OccupationFiction writer, critic
Period1938–1985
GenreScience fiction, horror, mystery, and western novels and short fiction
SubjectScience fiction (as critic)
Notable works
Notable awardsHugo, Nebula[1]
Sturgeon's "The Perfect Host" was the cover story in the November 1948 Weird Tales
An early version of Sturgeon's first novel, "The Dreaming Jewels", was the cover story in the February 1950 issue of Fantastic Adventures
Sturgeon's novella "The Incubi of Parallel X" was the cover story in the September 1951 Planet Stories
Sturgeon's novella "Granny Won't Knit" took the cover of the Mar 1954 Galaxy Science Fiction, illustrated by Ed Emshwiller

Theodore Sturgeon (ən/; born Edward Hamilton Waldo, February 26, 1918 – May 8, 1985) was an American writer, primarily of fantasy, science fiction and horror. He was also a critic. He wrote approximately 400 reviews and more than 200 stories.[2]

Sturgeon's science fiction novel More Than Human (1953) won the 1954 International Fantasy Award (for SF and fantasy) as the year's best novel and the Science Fiction Writers of America ranked "Baby is Three" number five among the "Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time" to 1964. Ranked by votes for all of their pre-1965 novellas, Sturgeon was second among authors, behind Robert Heinlein.

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame inducted Sturgeon in 2000, its fifth class of two dead and two living writers.[3]

Biography

Sturgeon was born Edward Hamilton Waldo in Staten Island, New York in 1918. His name was legally changed to Theodore Sturgeon at age eleven after his mother's divorce and remarriage to William Dicky ("Argyll") Sturgeon.[4]

He sold his first story in 1938 to the McClure Syndicate, which bought much of his early work. His first genre story[citation needed] was "Ether Breather", published by John W. Campbell in the September 1939 issue of Astounding Science Fiction.[2] At first he wrote mainly short stories, primarily for genre magazines such as Astounding and Unknown, but also for general-interest publications such as Argosy Magazine. He used the pen name "E. Waldo Hunter" when two of his stories ran in the same issue of Astounding. A few of his early stories were signed "Theodore H. Sturgeon."

Sturgeon ghost-wrote one Ellery Queen mystery novel, The Player on the Other Side (Random House, 1963). This novel gained critical praise from critic H. R. F. Keating: "[I] had almost finished writing Crime and Mystery: the 100 Best Books, in which I had included The Player on the Other Side ... placing the book squarely in the Queen canon"[5] when he learned that it had been written by Sturgeon. Similarly, William DeAndrea, author and winner of Mystery Writers of America awards, selecting his ten favorite mystery novels for the magazine Armchair Detective, picked The Player on the Other Side as one of them. He said: "This book changed my life ... and made a raving mystery fan (and therefore ultimately a mystery writer) out of me. ... The book must be 'one of the most skilful pastiches in the history of literature. An amazing piece of work, whomever did it'."[5]

Disliking arguments with Campbell over editorial decisions, after 1950 Sturgeon only published one story in Astounding.[6] Sturgeon wrote the screenplays for the Star Trek episodes "Shore Leave" (1966) and "Amok Time" (1967, written up and published as a Bantam Books "Star Trek Fotonovel" in 1978).[2] The latter is known for its invention of pon farr, the Vulcan mating ritual; first use of the sentence "Live long and prosper";[7] and first use of the Vulcan hand symbol. Sturgeon is also sometimes credited as having deliberately put homosexual subtext in his work, like the back-rub scene in "Shore Leave", and the short story "The World Well Lost". Sturgeon also wrote several episodes of Star Trek that were never produced. One of these was notable for having first introduced the Prime Directive. He also wrote an episode of the Saturday morning show Land of the Lost, "The Pylon Express", in 1975. Two of Sturgeon's stories were adapted for The New Twilight Zone. One, "A Saucer of Loneliness", was broadcast in 1986 and was dedicated to his memory. Another short story, "Yesterday was Monday", was the inspiration for The New Twilight Zone episode "A Matter of Minutes". His 1944 novella "Killdozer!" was the inspiration for the 1970s made-for-TV movie, Marvel comic book, and alternative rock band of the same name.

Sturgeon is well known among readers of classic science-fiction anthologies. At the height of his popularity in the 1950s he was the most anthologized English-language author alive.[8][9] Describing "To Here and the Easel" as "a stunning portrait of personality disassociation as perceived from the inside", Carl Sagan said that many of Sturgeon's works were among the "rare few science‐fiction novels [that] combine a standard science‐fiction theme with a deep human sensitivity".[10] John Clute wrote in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction: "His influence upon writers like Harlan Ellison and Samuel R. Delany was seminal, and in his life and work he was a powerful and generally liberating influence in post-WWII US sf". He is not much known by the general public, however, and he won comparatively few awards. (One was the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement from the 1985 World Fantasy Convention.)[1] His best work was published before the establishment and consolidation of the leading genre awards, while his later production was scarcer and weaker.[citation needed] He was listed[according to whom?] as a primary influence on the much more famous Ray Bradbury.

Sturgeon's original novels were all published between 1950 and 1961, and the bulk of his short story work dated from the 1940s and 1950s. Though he continued to write through 1983, his work rate dipped noticeably in the later years of his life; a 1971 story collection entitled Sturgeon Is Alive And Well addressed Sturgeon's seeming withdrawal from the public eye in a tongue-in-cheek manner. Sturgeon lived for several years in Springfield, Oregon.[11] He died on May 8, 1985, of lung fibrosis, at Sacred Heart General Hospital in the neighboring city of Eugene.[11]

He was a member of the all-male literary banqueting club the Trap Door Spiders, which served as the basis of Isaac Asimov's fictional group of mystery solvers the Black Widowers. Sturgeon was the inspiration for the recurrent character of Kilgore Trout in the novels of Kurt Vonnegut.[12]

Other Languages
български: Теодор Стърджън
Bahasa Indonesia: Theodore Sturgeon
Nederlands: Theodore Sturgeon
português: Theodore Sturgeon
Simple English: Theodore Sturgeon
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Theodore Sturgeon
українська: Теодор Стерджон