Amarna

Amarna
العمارنة
Small aten temple.jpg
Small Temple of the Aten at Akhetaten
Amarna is located in Egypt
Amarna
Shown within Egypt
Alternative nameEl-Amarna, Tell el-Amarna
LocationMinya Governorate, Egypt
RegionUpper Egypt
Coordinates27°38′42.71″N 30°53′47.34″E / 27°38′42.71″N 30°53′47.34″E / 27.6451972; 30.8964833
TypeSettlement
History
BuilderAkhenaten
FoundedApproximately 1346 BC
PeriodsEighteenth dynasty of Egypt, Roman Empire

Amarna (ə/; Arabic: العمارنة‎, translit. al-ʿamārnah) is an extensive Egyptian archaeological site that represents the remains of the capital city newly established (1346 BC) and built by the Pharaoh Akhenaten of the late Eighteenth Dynasty, and abandoned shortly after his death (1332 BC).[1] The name for the city employed by the ancient Egyptians is written as Akhetaten (or Akhetaton—transliterations vary) in English transliteration. Akhetaten means "Horizon of the Aten".[2]

The area is located on the east bank of the Nile River in the modern Egyptian province of Minya, some 58 km (36 mi) south of the city of al-Minya, 312 km (194 mi) south of the Egyptian capital Cairo and 402 km (250 mi) north of Luxor.[3] The city of Deir Mawas lies directly west across from the site of Amarna. Amarna, on the east side, includes several modern villages, chief of which are el-Till in the north and el-Hagg Qandil in the south.

The area was also occupied during later Roman and early Christian times; excavations to the south of the city have found several structures from this period.[4]

Name

The name Amarna comes from the Beni Amran tribe that lived in the region and founded a few settlements. The ancient Egyptian name was Akhetaten.

(This site should be distinguished from Tell Amarna in Syria, a Halaf period archaeological tell.[5])

English Egyptologist, Sir John Gardner Wilkinson visited Amarna twice in the 1820s and identified it as 'Alabastron',[6] following the sometimes contradictory descriptions of Roman-era authors Pliny (On Stones) and Ptolemy (Geography),[7][8] although he was not sure about the identification and suggested Kom el-Ahmar as an alternative location.[9]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Amarna
العربية: تل العمارنة
беларуская: Амарна
български: Ахетатон
català: Al-Amārna
čeština: El Amarna
Deutsch: Amarna
Ελληνικά: Αμάρνα
español: Amarna
français: Amarna
한국어: 아마르나
հայերեն: Էլ–Ամառնա
hrvatski: Amarna
Bahasa Indonesia: Amarna
italiano: Amarna
עברית: אל-עמארנה
ქართული: ელ-ამარნა
қазақша: Амарна
Kiswahili: Amarna
lietuvių: Amarna
magyar: Ahet-Aton
Nederlands: Achetaton
日本語: アマルナ
norsk: Amarna
ਪੰਜਾਬੀ: ਅਮਰਨਾ
polski: Amarna
português: Amarna
română: Amarna
русский: Амарна
shqip: Amarna
සිංහල: අමර්ණ
Simple English: Amarna
slovenščina: Amarna
српски / srpski: Амарна
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Amarna
suomi: Akhetaten
svenska: El-Amarna
Tagalog: Amarna
Türkçe: Amarna
українська: Амарна
اردو: عمارنہ
Tiếng Việt: Amarna
中文: 阿玛纳